The Order of Evangelical Grace in the Economy of Salvation

THE

ORDER 

OF 

EVANGELICAL GRACE

IN

THE ECONOMY OF SALVATION; 

CONTAINED IN

FOUR DIALOGUES

UPON MATTERS OF THE HIGHEST IMPORTANCE.

BY

DAVID HOLLAZ,

Pastor of the Evangelical Church of Gunthersberg, in Pomerania. 

  TRANSLATED FROM THE FRENCH,
WITH OCCASIONAL NOTES BY THE TRANSLATOR.

“The first man, Adam, was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit. Howbeit, that was not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural, and afterwards that which is spiritual. The first man is of the earth, earthy; the second man is the Lord from heaven,” 1 Cor. xv. 45—47.

LONDON :

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE TRANSLATOR,

By J. Eedes, 14 Little Knight Rider Street, Doctors’ Commons.— Sold also by
R. Baynes, Paternoster Row, and other Booksellers.

1838

ADVERTISEMENT.

The following experimental and interesting Dialogues came into the Translator’s possession some years back. At that time he had a head knowledge of the doctrines contained in them, but no heart acquaintance with the grace of those doctrines. This, working with the pride of nature, led to daring presumption, which would have precipitated his soul into the yawning gulf of eternal ruin, had not mercy prevented. But God was merciful; and, to the conviction of sin, added the gifts of repentance and faith, which, conducting to the cross of the Lord Jesus, begot in him a living hope, and eventually issued in the attainment of peace with a justly offended God. He can now subscribe to much of the experience, so faithfully and scripturally detailed in this excellent little Treatise; and being persuaded that it is a work pre-eminently fitted, as a means, under the divine blessing, to promote the increase and progress of vital religion, he humbly presents a translation of it to the public, praying that, where ever the providence of God may direct its course; he will accompany it with the light and grace of his Holy Spirit, without which, Paul might have planted, and Apollos watered, in vain, 1 Cor. iii. 6.

The Pharisee will find therein exposed the ruinous foundation he builds upon; and, that it is equally irrational as unscriptural, to rest the hope of immortality and glory, in any degree, upon the works of a creature, “conceived in sin, and shapen in wickedness,” Psa. li. 5.

The mere Professor will be shown (however Well stored his head may be with the knowledge of the doctrines of the Gospel), that knowledge, without grace, will not reach the heart, or impress upon the soul the image of the meek and lowly Jesus—a work inseparable from the new creation, and the only thing that renders it acceptable in the sight of God, 2 Cor. iii. 18; 1 Pet. iii. 4.

The Awakened Sinner, burdened with guilt, and labouring under the painful convictions of his deplorable and hopeless condition by nature; alarmed at the malediction of an infinitely holy law, which affords no hope to the guilty, will, in these Dialogues, find described the saving work of the Spirit, in his first operations upon the conscience, and will be led progressively, and, in the end, comfortably, into the experience “that judgment must first begin at the house of God,” 1 Pet. iv. 17; and thence to the blood of sprinkling, which alone can speak pardon and peace to the guilty and condemned.

The Believer will also meet with much interesting and instructive matter, respecting the causes of the weakness of faith, and occasional relapses into unbelief; together with the means pointed out, by which faith is established.

The last Dialogue treats of Sanctification, as being productive of a growing meetness for glory, and concludes with some observations respecting the Believer’s transit from the cross to the crown, through the valley of the shadow of death.

In fine, this little Book, under the teaching of the Holy Spirit, will be a valuable guide to those who are saying, “What shall I do to be saved?and are truly in earnest about their eternal felicity. The Translator is induced to publish it in Monthly Numbers, being a mode more convenient to himself, and, at the same time, rendering the purchase of it easier to persons of limited means. It will, moreover, enable the reader to give the subjects treated of the deliberate and often resumed attention they merit and require. There are a few occasional notes by the Translator.

January 1st, 1838.

Preface
The First Dialogue
The Second Dialogue
The Third Dialogue
The Fourth Dialogue

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